Bootstrap Example

Definition:

The tricky task of genre-tagging without getting bogged down in too many sub-genres forced me into creating my own tag, Dubbeat which, as I see it, can exist in pop, rock or dance music. In simple terms, the tag is used where dubby basslines are the prominent feature, but the track doesn't identify as Reggae. For the avoidance of doubt, regular dub music is Reggae.


The Jukebox Pick (of 1,078):

 No-Ones Little Girl

 (Ana da Silva, Georgina Birch, Victoria Aspinall)

 The Raincoats

 10 out of 10 “Utterly perfect” Dubbeat

 “Sweet little girl, I wanna be your boyfriend” sang the Ramones in '76. Art student Gina Birch got to thinking and “No One’s Little Girl”, her first-ever song, was written for a college project, and was showcased in November '77 at the debut gig of her band, The Raincoats, which she had formed with her fellow student, Ana da Silva (vocals, guitar). You don't need to conform, seek adventure, create was her message. Musically, Toots and the Maytals “Funky Kingston” LP (1973) was Gina's first bass love - this influence is apparent in her work from the off. An almost five year gestation period ensued before the piece was fully realised on record, the 45 being first issued in the late summer of 1982. By then, they were a core trio of Gina, Ana and the classically trained violinist, Vicky Aspinall. This was the Raincoats at their mighty peak, the oddness of the piece being typical of their free-thinking oeuvre. Bassist Kim Gordon loved them: “They seemed like ordinary people playing extraordinary music. Music that was natural that made room for cohesion of personalities. They had enough confidence to be vulnerable and to be themselves without having to take on the mantle of male rock/punk rock aggression... or the typical female as sex symbol avec irony or sensationalism.”


Some favourite artists:

The Clash, Massive Attack, Death In Vegas, The Bug, Asian Dub Foundation

The Jukebox pick:

 

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